American and Canadian Literary and Cultural Studies

The Department of American and Canadian Studies specializes in Hemispheric, Transatlantic and Transpacific research on the Americas, approaching the cultures of the dual continent as inextricably connected "communicating vessels." A thus defined research profile allows us to diagnose the dynamics of the interdependence between phenomena and processes taking occurring "within" the Americas, but also "across the oceans": between Europe and Africa and the Americas -- as well as between the Americas and Asia and Oceania.

Within such general frames, the research Faculty of the Department foster their studies in the following thematic areas:

a) Theory and Methodology

  • methodological foundations of hemispheric and transoceanic studies of the Americas;
  • methodological foundations of hemispheric and transoceanic studies of the Americas;
  • poststructural theories of race, class and gender in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic studies of the Americas;
  • methodological foundations of postcolonial studies in light of their application to the studies of the Americas;
  • theoretical aspects of the relations between literature, history/historiography and philosophy;
  • methodological basis of the application of psychohistory to literary and cultural research
  • theoretical aspects of identity studies in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic studies of the Americas;
  • methodological foundations of the studies on the diasporas, interculturality, transculturality, trans-indigeneity/autochtony in the cultures of the Americas;
  • mythographic criticism and myth theories in the context of American and Canadian metanarratives;
  • methodology of the interdisciplinary folklore research in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic studies on the Americas;
  • methodology of interdisciplinary comparative studies in the context of music and literature;
  • musico-literary research ("music of the words," thematization of music in a literary work, musical constructions in literature)
  • contemporary and historical discourses of technology: technology in culture studies;
  • theoretical aspects of cyberculture studies and research on interactive narratives;
  • theoretical aspects of the relationships between the evolution of law and the course of the cultural- and literary-historical proces.

b) Diachronic Studies

  • literary history of the United States and Canada in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations;
  • history of Polish American and Polish Canadian culture (with particular focus on literature);
  • history of US and Canadian drama in the context of identity discourses
  • transcultural dialog between countries of the dual American continent and Poland/Europe
  • literary and cultural history of autochtonous cultures, ethnic cultures and diasporas;
  • history and political culture of the United States and Canada;
  • history of regional cultures in the United States and Canada;
  • art history in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations;
  • alternative histories of the Americas;
  • "conspiracy theories" in local and global contexts;
  • diachronic studies on the folklore of the United States and Canada in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations (orature, folktales, ballads);
  • history of American and Canadian music in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations;
  • biblical inspirations in the literatures of the countries of the North American continent.
  • c) Interdisciplinary Studies of the Americas

  • musico-literary research

— jazz and popular music in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations.

  • research on culture of the New Media and Globalization Age

— computer and videogames - and the American copyright system: intellectual property laws and privacy rights;
— television studies in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations;
— knowledge, aesthetics, ethics and pedagogy of indigenous peoples in the context of globalization.

  • research on ideology in light of social phenomena

— ideological foundations of the "American Dream";
— the phenomenon of the American South;
— political correctness and the literature of "white nationalism".

  • research on philosophy of literature and art

— the literature of the "American Renaissance" as a mode of philosophical expression;
— "America" as a "faith-based initiative";
— literatures of the North American continent in light of "factography" (creative non-fiction, reportage, journalism);
— oceans apart: continents separated with/connected by oceans in mutual fantasies.

— literary echoes of philosophical and theosophical thought (mysticism by Thomas Merton)

  • research on the "Grand Themes of American Literature"

d) Hemispheric, Transatlantic and Transpacific Research Research on the Americas, approaching the cultures of the dual continent as inextricably connected "communicating vessels." A thus defined research profile allows us to diagnose the dynamics of the interdependence between phenomena and processes taking occurring "within" the Americas, but also "across the oceans": between Europe and Africa and the Americas -- as well as between the Americas and Asia and Oceania. Within such general frames, the research Faculty of the Department foster their studies in the following thematic areas:

  • Theory and Methodology, the core of which are methodological foundations of hemispheric and transoceanic studies of the Americas,
  • Diachronic Studies, which concentrate on literary history of the United States and Canada in the context of hemispheric and transoceanic cultural relations,
  • research on philosophy of literature and art based on the analysis of: the literature of the "American Renaissance" as a mode of philosophical expression; "America" as a "faith-based initiative";  literatures of the North American continent in light of "factography" (creative non-fiction, reportage, journalism); continents separated with/connected by oceans in mutual fantasies, and literary echoes of philosophical and theosophical thought.

 Go to the website of the Department of American and Canadian Studies.